Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Flower arrangement workshop makes gifts for seniors

The Ava Maria Garden workshop turned out to be an opportunity for community members to connect with each other. One participant brought children who assisted and enjoyed Valentine cookies. Photos by Deanna Cheng

BY DEANNA CHENG

Jane Wong led a group of participants on February 8, 2020 to create artistic flower arrangements with preserved roses, preserved hydrangea and moss. The workshop was held at St. Mary’s Elementary School and is an initiative of Ava Maria Garden, a charity based in Hong Kong.

The former florist said the event had two purposes. First, for each participant to take home a personal gift of flowers to brighten her home. “These are good as gifts for those who don’t want to take care of it, like watering and changing the soil.”

She added, “If there’s dust on the flowers, just blow it gently with a fan or a paintbrush. You could even use a makeup brush.”

Jane Wong used to run her own business in the wedding industry for over five years, back in Hong Kong. She arrived in Vancouver this past summer and was looking for ways to get to know the community.

Preserved flowers are different from live ones, Wong said. The ones used in the workshop are treated with a machine and chemicals and they will last from one to three years with minimal upkeep.

Over time, the colour will fade but the blooms will retain their shape, she said. More thought and consideration is put into the arrangement of preserved flowers because recipients will have to look at them for a long time.

“Layering the flowers in your arrangement will make it look more natural like a garden,” Wong said. “Nothing is straight and even in nature.”

Workshop participant Vee Caylin was interested in the event because she had never worked with preserved flowers before. She works in the event industry and only interacts with live flowers. It was also her first time creating a flower arrangement around a miniature statue.

The second purpose of the workshop was to create extra flower arrangements as gifts for seniors at Courtyard Terrace Seniors Community. Wong said the ones for the seniors will be created with silk flowers because they will require minimal care and they wouldn’t aggravate any allergies.

The next flower workshop Wong is hosting will be for Mother’s Day. For those interested, she can be reached at jane@avamariagarden.org.

Deanna Cheng is a freelance journalist and copy editor. Her work has been published in New Canadian Media and Vancouver Courier. She has also been a resident for the last 15 years. Contact: dmwcheng7@gmail.com.

Copyright 2020 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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All’Italiana: Italian fashion in the spotlight

The knit pom poms on these two outfits hark back to clowns, a popular stock character in Italian opera. Italy has a long history and strong heritage in professional theatre with Commedia dell’arte (“Italian comedy”). One of the most famous Italian operas is Pagliacci (Italian for “clowns” or “players”). Photos courtesy of the Italian Cultural Centre

New exhibit at the Italian Cultural Centre

All’Italiana
Italian Cultural Centre
3075 Slocan Street, Vancouver
http://www.italianculturalcentre.ca
Tuesday to Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm

BY DEANNA CHENG

The latest exhibition at the Italian Cultural Centre focuses on the highlights of Italian fashion in the 20th century, featuring garments by Pucci, Schiaparelli and Fortuny.

Guest curator Ivan Sayers wanted to focus on Italian fashion because the spotlight is usually on French, American or British fashion. “Italy is extremely important, especially in leather goods and accessories but also with mainstream garments.”

The show is an opportunity to admire Italian ingenuity, wit, craftsmanship and quality, he said.

On display until April 25, All’Italiana (“in the Italian style”) is part of a celebration of craftsmanship by the Craft Council of BC. The theme of this year is “voices of craft.”

Sayers said, “Craft usually means handwork.” And handwork is visible in the handmade raffia lace of the Fortuny dress, he said, and in the decoration on the Schiaparelli coat. “It’s beading. It’s eccentric. It’s still labour intensive.”

He added, “When you look at the Prada suit, initially, it seems banal but when you start to look at the seaming and the skirt, you start to appreciate what’s gone into it, lifting it from boring to intriguing.”

There’s construction, decoration, ratio and proportion that people tend to ignore, but it still has value, he said.

Museum curator Angela Clarke said the exhibit explores craft because it often gets a bad name. “Craft is often looked at as something that you often find in your grandmother’s place. You know, doilies.”

It’s often seen as surface design without much in terms of artistic integrity, originality, a voice of the artist or social commentary, she said. “Craft is often recreating a tradition. There are often patterns incorporated into craft that have been used almost like a stencil.”

When you knit, you base it on a pattern, Clarke said. If you embroider, you base it on a pattern. “And that is sort of a counter to this notion that all art creation is individual and it’s a one-off. So craft gets a bad name for that.”

Garments are considered like that because they have a pattern. The world of fashion is changing because it’s the name of the designer that we come to for and that often separates craft from art, she said.

Historically, there were some names that were developing such as Schiaparelli through the 1930s and Christian Dior in the late 40s and 50s. It’s not to the same degree as today, she said, where the name is everything. “We now have celebrities with clothing lines and certainly, they’re not the ones designing and making the garments at all.”

She said, “Today, everyone wants to be a designer but no one wants to be a tailor.”

“The fact is that craft often represents underrepresented voices,” added Clarke.

Guest curator Ivan Sayers said Italy is the birthplace of lace. Italian lace comes from the fishing culture in small Italian towns, drawing inspiration from fishing nets.

For example, textiles and embroidery were considered the realm of women’s history, she said. “And for the most part, that’s all we’ve got of women’s history for the middle and lower classes. Anything out of the household, the domestic space, it’s all about women.”

Italian fashion also constantly refers to its own history from the materials to the construction. For example, Clarke said, Italian lace arises from fishing culture as an improvisation of the fishing net.

The fishing net has become part of the cultural consciousness of Italian villages because it’s the major industry. “You get these towns, these whole towns, that are in Italy that are devoted to certain craft industries such as Venetian glass and ceramics.”

It’s partially so they can share resources, she said. The other part is due to technology used for the flammable arts.

If you were to make anything glass or ceramic in Rome, Venice or Milan, the whole city would go up in flames in half an hour if there was an accident because buildings were made of wood, Clarke said.

Legislation was created, stating these industries had to be 10 miles outside of a major city centre.

Another sign of Italian heritage is the knit pom poms on the Paoli dress. The colourful fluffy attachments refer to the clown, popular in Italian opera, she said. The significance of this character spread across Europe by travelling Italian troupes.

“Clowns show up repeatedly because it’s the stock character of a figure that can say anything, do anything, and you feel compassion for them,” Clarke said. “It’s like the joker in Shakespeare. He’s the one who entertains the king but he’s the only one that can actually speak the truth.”

Rich Nguyen, an attendee, visited Italy last year and the selection of Schiaparelli and Pucci within the exhibit speaks to him the most as “Italian.”

This collection features garments from the collection of fashion historian Ivan Sayers, the Museum of Vancouver and the Society for the Museum of Original Costume.

Deanna Cheng is a freelance journalist and copy editor. Her work has been published in New Canadian Media and Vancouver Courier. She has also been a resident for the last 15 years. Contact: dmwcheng7@gmail.com.


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Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival is back on September 14, 2019

Moon-Fest-2019-poster

BY ANGUS HO

The Moon Festival is back for its 17th year on Saturday, September 14, 2019! This family-friendly event in Renfrew-Collingwood will bring you tonnes of live music, entertainment, beautiful art displays, food and more, for a thoroughly enjoyable afternoon and evening.

Co-produced by Still Moon Arts Society and the Renfrew Park Community Association, the festival celebrates the harvest abundance and the full moon, while bringing to attention the natural beauty of Renfrew Ravine and Still Creek, which is one of the few remaining open stre ams with urban forest in the city.

Join us and over 5,000 other attendees from all over East Vancouver neighbourhoods to experience the transformation of the natural environment of the Renfrew Ravine into an enchanting scene of light, colour and music.

Pre-Moon Festival workshops

Come take part in public workshops offered throughout the month of September. Prior to the festival, you can make your own lanterns to help guide your way through the night, or learn how to make delicious mooncakes.

September 3 6: Arduino Lantern Workshop (5 8 pm) at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $100 (4 days)

Fee includes $65 supplies for electronics and lantern materials. Must bring your own laptop with pre-installed apps – registration and details on the website stillmoonarts.ca.

September 7: 5 8 pm: Mooncake Workshop at CNH Annex // $20

September 8: 10 am 1 pm: Mooncake Workshop at CNH Annex // $20

September 7 & 9: Fire and Water Lanterns at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $20 (2 days)

September 7: 1:30 4:30 pm

September 9: 4 7 pm

September 8 & 9: Mushroom Lanterns at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $25 (2 days)

September 8: 1:30 4:30 pm

September 9: 4 7 pm

September 10, 11, 12: Glass Jar Lanterns (4 7 pm) at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $10 (1 day)

Moon Festival Schedule September 14

Harvest Fair: 4 – 7:30 pm @ Slocan Park

The Moon Festival kicks off with the Harvest Fair, a family-friendly festival featuring local musicians and performers, community organizations, food, games and activities, and a harvest competition where you can bring your homegrown crops to win prizes.

Twilight Lantern Walk: 7:30 – 8 pm

At sunset, attendees are encouraged to light their lanterns and join the parade, which is complete with live music and costumed participants. The parade will pass by various art installations and maybe even surprise performances until it reaches Renfrew Park.

Lantern Festival: 8 – 8:45 pm @ Renfrew Park

At Renfrew Park, witness the beauty of candlelight, exquisite lanterns, ethereal music and the shimmering Still Creek, with entertainment and food just outside of the ravine. The evening closes off with a finale spectacle featuring dancing, stilting, fire spinning and an explosion of light.

For more detailed information on the workshops, Moon Festival schedule, and accessibility, visit stillmoonarts.ca.

Cracks-in-Creeks-artists

Performers and organizers after the performance of Cracks in Creeks. (L to r) Isabelle Russell, Jenna Berlyn, Roxanna Wang, Red Fawkes, Marie Whimbey, Tasha Hillman, Carmen Rosen, Starr Muranko, Devan Pawa-Larsen, Bea Miller. Photo by Angus Ho

Cracks in Creeks: Final showcase at the CNH Annex on September 22

On August 11, a group of emerging artists performed a site-specific version of Cracks in Creeks: Live Streaming on the banks of Still Creek, as part of the Vines Art Festival. The performers embraced the natural sounds and beauty of the ravine in their surroundings, while the audience moved through the creekside space in Renfrew Park with the performers. Tea was served after the performance alongside a knowledge-sharing session about Indigenous plants in the ravine.

You can still attend the final indoor performance of Cracks in Creeks at the Collingwood Neighbourhood House Annex on September 22, from 6 to 7:30 pm. Join in witnessing the culmination of this youth mentorship project that spanned the entire summer.

Over many weeks, the performers of Cracks in Creeks were inspired by knowledge about Renfrew Ravine’s ecosystem, teachings about Indigenous plants and medicines, eco-art created by Still Moon Arts, and choreography lessons by professional dance mentors. Entrance to the final performance is based on a sliding scale from $5 to $20.

For more information on the performance and all events happening in September, visit the new website at stillmoonarts.ca. Follow Still Moon Arts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @stillmoonarts to stay up to date on all of our news!