Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Come out – dig in! Earth Day celebration at Everett Crowley Park, April 27, 2019

Saturday, April 27, 11 am – 3 pm. From the 7200 Kerr Street parking lot, follow the signs to the Earth Fest celebration site.

BY MARY HIEBERT

Did you know that southeast Vancouver is home to one of the largest parks in the city?

Everett Crowley Park is an urban forest. From the views of Richmond farmlands to the tranquil Avalon Pond, the park has many trails and quiet places to enjoy the choruses of birds amid the lush woodland.

The site is named for Park Board Commissioner Everett Crowley, long-time resident and owner of Avalon, Vancouver’s last independent dairy. Formerly known as the Kerr Road Dump, this area was a closed landfill for 25 years before its official opening as a park in 1987.

Through the hard work and dedication of community stewards and the Parks Board, the natural environment is recovering resulting in a lovely wooded and hilly habitat frequented by birds and other urban wildlife. A great place for dog walking, too.

In 2017 the Vancouver Parks Board piloted a park stewardship program in Everett Crowley Park. Individuals, couples and families enthusiastically volunteered to help keep “invasives” at bay in newly replanted areas of the park. The Park Stewardship program is now growing strong, with monthly “invasive pull” events. Working together is a fun and efficient way to get things done!

Everett Crowley Park is a perfect place for nature-based learning. School and out-of-school groups are invited to come and learn.

A scheduled school class arrives at nearby Champlain Heights Community Centre where the first lesson is: History.

Looking up at the giant jigsaw puzzle mural in the community centre’s entrance way, the children learn how long humans have lived in this area, who the first peoples were and how they lived. The story unfolds, First Nations, then colonization, logging of the area, then dairy farming, City landfill and finally what is now Everett Crowley Park.

Then it’s off to the park itself for hands-on tree planting by the children, mushroom log inoculation, sound scaping and listening. A very healthy way to learn.

If you haven’t visited Everett Crowley Park for a while, come out to the Earth Fest celebration on Saturday, April 27. There will be a wide range of free family-friendly activities including music and dance by the Tiddley Cove Morris Dancers, eco-demonstrations such as mason bee care and health, Dogs in the Park Initiative, nature talks and walks, forest-based learning, stream-keeping Vancouver’s streams and rivers, hands on making of spore and seed “bombs.”

You can also join volunteers to plant bee-friendly shrubs and tree-friendly mushrooms. Learn the past history of the park and where it’s growing, what park stewards are doing and how you can be involved.

The entertainment, exhibits and activities are all free and wheelchair accessible. Free healthy snacks and refreshments – please bring your own cup!

This annual community event is organized by local residents and is supported by the Champlain Heights Community Association’s Everett Crowley Park Committee in partnership with the Vancouver Parks Board. Saturday, April 27, 11 am – 3 pm. From the 7200 Kerr Street parking lot, follow the signs to the Earth Fest celebration site.

Mary Hiebert is a park steward with the Everett Crowley Park Committee.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Join the fight against climate change at the 9th annual Earth Day Parade, April 20, 2019

More than 1,000 community members will march on Saturday, April 20, will you be one of them?

BY RACHEL CHOW

Our planet is being hurt by our environmental and social decisions and the first step to changing that is by raising awareness and shifting how we think about our relationship to the natural world.

The Youth 4 Climate Justice Now Committee invites everyone in the Lower Mainland to attend the 9th annual Earth Day Parade on April 20, 2019, to participate in a fun day of learning about environmental issues, celebrate the work being down in communities around climate justice and learn how we can shape a more sustainable world.

Windermere Leadership students invite the community to march in the 9th annual Earth Day Parade, Saturday, April 20, 2019. Pictured is Earth Day Parade 2018. Photo by Michael Wheatley

“It’s hard to take the first step towards making change, especially for youth, but this generation is the future and our choices will affect both us and generations to come, so we need to take action now if we still want a planet to live on,” says Rachel Chow, one of the organizers this year.

“Throughout the years, society’s connection to nature has faded, but that connection will never disappear,” she continues. “My whole life, I’ve been surrounded by both cities and nature, and I can’t imagine a planet where that balance is broken. I want to spread awareness about these problems because if our view on nature isn’t changed, I don’t even know if I’ll have a future to look forward to.”

The goal of the parade and festival is to inform the community of our current climate situation and provide them with a reason to care about the planet. It will be on Saturday, April 20, 2019 from 1 to 3 pm starting at Commercial and Broadway and continuing to Grandview Park. There will be guest speakers, performers, and diverse booths about many topics that youth find most pressing in the climate justice movement.

About the Earth Day Parade

For the past 9 years, Windermere Leadership students have taken on the role of organizing the parade to host an event for Earth Day created by youth, for youth, about environmental and social problems and how we can help shape the future that we want. Each year, they host a festival with many different booths and speakers at Grandview Park to engage the community in these problems. This year will be the 9th year Leadership students will host this celebration and they hope to bring about change in any way they can. Learn more at: http://earthdayparade.ca/ or https://instagram.com/windermereldp?utm_source=ig_profile_share&igshid=1civybdp6bxpx

Rachel Chow is a student in the Leadership program at Windermere Secondary and the Earth Day coordinator.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Read On: There is something in the spring air

Read On Word Search April 2019 – There is something in the spring air

BY TONY WANLESS

When spring arrives, bringing with it better weather and renewed spirits, many of us find our moods lifting. We feel more cheerful, energetic and friendly.

We notice that spending so much time in our houses or apartments during the rainy and cold winter has left us thinking they look a bit worn, shabby or dirty.

So we decide a good scrubbing will help renew the place.

We also start thinking that maybe our lives could also use a good cleaning of a sort.

We believe we should spend more time enjoying and less complaining. Maybe we should get out there and have a little fun. Maybe we should be better human beings.

We think these thoughts because spring is a time of renewal.

In spring, birds that disappeared during the colder months suddenly sing again outside our windows. Thoughts that were gloomy are now more positive and joyful.

For most of us, spring signals a time to start a new life, or change an old one.

So we sort through our closets or lockers for our warmer weather clothes. Sometimes we find them old and inappropriate and decide to buy new ones to celebrate the new feeling.

We also start sorting through our mental closets because we believe that, maybe, our minds also need awakening after dark and cold months.

Signals that winter is over and brighter times are beginning to appear leave us with more bounce in our steps, our heads held a little higher, and a belief that this is the way it will be from now on.

This mental and physical spring cleaning can also revive old plans and desires – for different ways of living or the renewal of plans that had been tucked away in our minds because they seemed too difficult.

Now they seem more possible.

Similarly, we start thinking about reviving relationships with other people that may have withered during the long period of solitude.

Like the flowers, we also look forward to renewing.

Definitions

mood: a temporary state of mind or feeling
shabby: in poor condition through long or hard use or lack of care
sort: to put in a certain place or rank according to kind, class or nature
wither: to lose vitality, force or freshness
renew: to make like new; restore to freshness, vigour or perfection

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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April 2019 issue of RCC News is here

 

RCC News April 2019

The cherry blossoms are a sure sign that spring is here! Let’s celebrate the season with heartwarming stories from this issue of the RCC News – it’s full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • CIBC at Kingsway and Joyce celebrates its 100th anniversary on April 3
  • Windermere Leadership presents 9th annual Earth Day Parade April 20
  • Earth Fest at Everett Crowley Park April 27
  • Movie Night: She Has a Name
  • In Loving Memory of Owen Michael Brown
  • Collingwood Corner: Joyce and Kingsway in 1931
  • Third Community Open House at Three Links

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the May 2019 issue is April 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.