Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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15th Annual Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival, September 30, 2017

Twilight Lantern Walk Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival

Festival goers get ready at Slocan Park for the Twilight Lantern Walk. Photo by Ben Rosen-Purcell

BY JUNE LAM

With fall fast approaching, Still Moon Arts Society has been preparing for the 15th annual Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival, held this year on Saturday, Sept. 30.

The Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival is a signature festival that celebrates the full moon and harvest abundance, while honouring diverse cultural traditions. The festival will highlight art, music, environmental stewardship and community participation.

This year’s theme, Migrations, allows attendees to reflect on the global movements that occur every day, from the smallest of salmon fry to the largest of humans. Birds journey across land and sea to discover new places and build their nests; salmon and fish swim across vast oceans to spawn new life and continue the survival of their species and others; humans flow within and across boundaries to pursue new opportunities, reunite with loved ones or find safety.

With the current issues in our world, these systems of movement have played a significant role in people’s identity and relationships. As you yourself move through the festival and experience the installations of this year’s event, we invite you to discover your own stories and how you relate to this year’s theme.

MOON FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

Harvest Fair: 4–6:45 pm
Slocan Park

The event gets under way with the Harvest Fair, which will feature live music, food and a booths from local organizations, artisans and non-profit groups. Another featured activity is the Harvest Fair, a home-grown harvest competition, which features entries by local gardeners of some of Renfrew-Collingwood’s best fruits, vegetables and flowers. Enter for a chance to win some awesome prizes!

Twilight Lantern Walk: 6:45 pm

The Twilight Lantern Walk begins with a moonlit parade from Slocan Park to Renfrew Park. Festival goers light their own lanterns and walk the trails along the ravine, accompanied by live music as darkness falls. Passing by the river-stone labyrinth, the procession will be invited to a walking meditation surrounded by music and light. The parade then passes by various art installations and surprise performances until it reaches Renfrew Park.

Lantern Festival: 7:15–8:30 pm
Renfrew Park

At nightfall, time slows down as participants absorb the beauty of candlelight, exquisite lanterns, ethereal music and the shimmering stream. Just outside of the stream, you’ll find musicians playing at the main stage, a Tea Garden full of delicious treats for you to enjoy, and a finale spectacle featuring dancing, stilting, fire spinning and fireworks.

Leading up to the big day, there will be multiple lantern workshops throughout the month. Don’t have a lantern for the parade? For a small cost, varying between $10 and $25, come out to Slocan Hall (2750 E. 29th Avenue) to make one:

Sept. 16: Advanced Lanterns (12–4 pm) – no instructor present

Sept. 18, 19, 20: Bamboo Lanterns (4–7 pm)

Sept. 21, 22: Globe Lanterns (4–7 pm)

Sept. 23: Advanced Lanterns (12–4 pm) – no instructor present

Sept. 25, 26: Globe Lanterns (4–7 pm)

Sept. 27, 28: Glass Jar Lanterns (4–7 pm)

For more information, visit stillmoon.org or our Facebook page, @stillmoonarts.

June Lam is the communications coordinator at Still Moon Arts Society. She graduated from the Leadership Program at Windermere Secondary and is currently attending the University of BC. She is also an avid volunteer and has been involved in the Renfrew-Collingwood community throughout her high school career. 

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

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Gathering of Canoes – 2017 Pulling Together Journey

Canoe-journey

Photos by Penny Lim

BY PENNY LIM

The Gathering of Canoes was a long-anticipated event, one of the Canada 150th birthday events and the culmination of the annual Pulling Together Canoe Journey. First Nations paddlers – including our very own Collingwood C.R.E.W. based out of Collingwood Neighbourhood House – started up the Sunshine Coast and participants joined in along the way.

Months of hearing of this historic undertaking coming to town. The day dawned. On July 14, 2017, a crowd waited breathlessly at Vanier Park for a sighting of these 23 canoes.

Canoe-journey-3

Here they come! The canoes circled in their protocol before landing. The paddlers asked for permission to land on the traditional territories of the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations.

Canoe-journey-2

The excitement was heavy in the air. The ceremony was very inclusive, with the RCMP, Police Department and Mayor amongst the paddlers. The different tribes got to know each other, too.

Witnessing this moment was a privilege in life. Absolutely exciting and joyous! Electric waves of emotion.

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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MOSAIC moves to Collingwood

MOSAIC moves to Collingwood

MOSAIC staff provide programs that address the needs of immigrants and refugees. Photo courtesy of MOSAIC

Julie had arrived from South Korea and was in Canada for a few years before connecting with MOSAIC.

Because Julie had some local connections and strong work experience from her home country, and was conversationally fluent in English, she did not initially seek out assistance from any settlement agencies.

After a couple of years spent adapting to her new community and establishing Canadian work experience via her own network within the South Korean community, Julie began seeking work in the mainstream community. She found that her qualifications earned her many interviews, but none of these resulted in a job or even a follow-up interview. Julie had lost her confidence and, in her own words, was “a little bit depressed.”

At this point, she contacted MOSAIC. At one of its group workshops, she learned successful interview strategies and tips, practised her new-found techniques with the group and received constructive feedback.

Just one week after the workshop, Julie had an interview and applied what she’d learned. She was offered a job in her desired field.

Through MOSAIC, newcomers like Julie can seek out help to find work, learn English, navigate in their new communities, and learn about Canadian culture and other factors that assist with settlement and integration to Vancouver.

The organization’s vision is to empower newcomers to fully participate in Canadian society. Their dedicated staff work with clients, volunteers, community partners and funders to provide a wide variety of programs that address the needs of immigrants and refugees.

And it’s not just newcomers like Julie that MOSAIC can help with employment-related assistance – the organization also operates the Vancouver Northeast Employment Services Centre – the Work BC office for Renfrew-Collingwood – which serves all citizens in B.C. and not just newcomers.

And now MOSAIC’s headquarters has relocated to the Collingwood community, taking up residence in the amenity space at the Wall Centre – Central Park complex (near Kingsway and Boundary) that was granted by the City of Vancouver.

“It’s a beautiful space and we’re excited to be in Collingwood, a community that has great diversity and a wonderful, family-friendly vibe,” says Dianna Lee, MOSAIC’s manager of marketing and communications.

MOSAIC was founded in 1976 to help Vancouver’s many non-English-speaking immigrants navigate the challenges they found in the city.

Since then, the organization has grown to more than 350 staff and 400 volunteers at 28 different sites across Metro Vancouver. The organization also has a thriving social enterprise, MOSAIC Interpretations and Translations Services, which is one of Canada’s leading providers in this sector.

MOSAIC offers more than 40 programs that cover every area of life, including settlement, employment, counselling and language learning, with services available in more than 30 languages. Although many of the programs are directed towards newcomers, MOSAIC’s services include conversation circles, mother’s circles, youth clubs and seniors’ programs that immigrants or citizens can participate in.

MOSAIC also provides services for temporary foreign workers and the LGBT community.

“No matter where you’re from, how old you are or what language you speak, MOSAIC can help you find what you need to live, work and become part of the community here,” says Lee. “MOSAIC will help newcomers to find the support they need.”

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Art Institute of Vancouver Multicultural Carnival

Many people enjoyed the Multicultural Carnival at the Art Institute of Vancouver. Photos by Luxi Lin

Many people enjoyed Multicultural Carnival at the Art Institute of Vancouver held late Nov. 2016. Photos by Luxi Lin

BY JERRY CHEN

The Art Institute of Vancouver, a post-secondary institution located in close proximity to the Renfrew SkyTrain station, hosted a Multicultural Carnival on the evening of November 22, 2016. In recognition of the diverse cultures represented at the Art Institute of Vancouver, the event recognized this diversity by sharing what different cultures have to offer.

Each of the venues set up represented a different country and its respective culture. Countries that were represented include Mexico, Philippine, Ukraine, Vietnam, Taiwan, China, Japan, Brazil, Afghanistan and Indonesia.

Art Institute of Vancouver staff and the Student Association get ready for the Multicultural Carnival.

Art Institute of Vancouver staff and the Student Association get ready for the Multicultural Carnival.

In order for attendees to gain a sense of these different cultures, each venue had a variety of games, food, activities and memorabilia derived directly from their country and culture. As such, attendees gained a first-hand experience of what each country and culture was like.

A show by the band The Noumenon and DJ performance by DJ 909 & Kennix provided live music, increasing the vibe of the event.

Making a special appearance was singer and songwriter Wanting Qu, who also happens to be an alumni of the Art Institute of Vancouver.

Attendees were enthusiastic about taking in what other cultures had to offer. They all enjoyed the abundance of activities that were available. It was a night filled with laughter and enjoyment, regardless of whether it is the people sharing the culture or those experiencing it.

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

 


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Remembering David Hanuse – A beloved elder

David Hanuse gives a traditional First Nations welcome

David Hanuse gives a traditional First Nations welcome at a gathering in 2008. Photo by Julie Cheng

Dave Hanuse, a former board member of Collingwood Neighbourhood House (CNH), elder to CNH’s Aboriginal youth, volunteer with Families Branching Out and just a very sweet man, passed away October 17, 2016. He was 73.

Dave was somebody who always looked on the bright side of life, loved to joke and laugh in his gentle way and spoke warmly about finding a home among the staff and volunteers at Collingwood Neighbourhood House.

He was generous in sharing his cultural knowledge and practices and often gave a blessing – singing and accompanying himself on the drum – before Families Branching Out dinners. He loved to join the youth in the Canoe Club and felt such peace and contentment canoeing with them. He last participated in the Canoe Club’s Pulling Together Journey about two or three years ago.

Dave’s health was failing over the last few years but he still made the effort to come to Families Branching Out, more recently accompanied by an aide. It obviously made a huge difference to him to be a part of Families Branching Out and of CNH.

Julie Cheng, editor of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News, recalled the days when she and David sat on the CNH board. “We had a special bond because we were both ‘newbies’ on the board, as he called us,” said Julie. “He always gave me a warm hug whenever he saw me.”

“I will always remember Dave’s twinkly, sparkling eyes,” recalled Jennifer Gray-Grant, CNH executive director. “He was the kind of person who absolutely focused on you when he spoke to you. He always gave you the sense that the time you spent speaking to him mattered to him. I will miss his kindness, his caring and his gentle manner.”

Copyright (c) 2016 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Still Moon Arts takes youth on a caravan along the Fraser

Carmen_team_Mount_Robson

The Still Moon Arts team started off at Mount Robson, the headwaters of the Fraser River. Photo courtesy of Still Moon Arts

 

BY LUCAS CHAN

Youth from the Still Moon Arts Society spent a week in June travelling along the Fraser River watershed in the 2nd annual Wild Salmon Caravan!

The Wild Salmon Caravan, taking place from June 6 to 11, was a journey from Mount Robson to Vancouver celebrating the spirit of the wild salmon through indigenous communities in Chase, Adams Lake, Kamloops, Lillooet, Lytton, Chilliwack and Abbotsford.

“The journey was really about celebrating, recognizing and honouring the spirit of the wild salmon, and how it is interconnected with First Nations culture as well as the rest of the environment,” said Henry Lau, one of the youth from the Still Moon Arts Youth Team.

The spirit of the salmon is something that influences across cultures and communities, representing more than just the ecological health of the land or water but also the relationships communities have with nature and each other.

Chitha_Lytton_Ceremony

It was an honour to take part in the Lytton ceremony. Photo by Chitha Manoranjan

Groups from across British Columbia joined the Wild Salmon Caravan in this travelling collective of culture, art, drumming, music and storytelling. It sought to connect with people and express the significance of salmon to the well-being of our cultures, communities, food systems and nature from an indigenous perspective.

“What I witnessed reminds me about how food is important to me in my neighborhood of Renfrew-Collingwood and how that is connected to the ways that First Nations groups access culturally relevant food in their own indigenous landscape,” said Crecien Bencio, who also participated in the journey.

The Wild Salmon Caravan also stressed the importance of building strong relationships with indigenous communities and conducting meaningful reconciliation processes. Threats of development and climate change endanger the well-being of the wild salmon that are so intricately linked with the land and its people. The Wild Salmon Caravan carried the wishes and hopes for what relationships with wild salmon was in the past, what it is in the present, and what will be in the future.

Still Moon’s previous youth engagement coordinator Chitha Manoranjan expressed, “I’m proud that we were able to take a small team of youth from this community up on this journey to share stories of our community’s successful efforts at bringing chum salmon back to Still Creek and bring some of Still Moon Arts’ creative energy. More importantly, it was an honour to be so warmly welcomed to different indigenous communities and be witness to the rich cultures and experiences that these communities have.“

The journey was part of Still Moon Arts’ Youth Engagement Project funded by the BC Arts Council. The youth team was made up of two Grade 9 students from the Leadership 9 Ecology class who have been working in the Renfrew Ravine this past year, and two long-time youth volunteers (and dedicated board members).

The team returns to the community with deeper knowledge, experiences and stories that are necessary to continue to act as stewards of the salmon and inspire the community to create their own intercultural experiences around food.

To find out more about Still Moon Arts Society’s journey on the Wild Salmon Caravan, visit www.stillmoon.org or find out more about the Wild Salmon Caravan at www.wildsalmoncaravan.wordpress.com.

Lucas Chan is a summer student with Still Moon Arts Society.

Copyright (c) 2016 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Celebrate Canada’s 149th birthday at Youth Celebrate Canada Day – July 1!

 

Youth Celebrate Canada Day at Renfrew Park, July 1

 
On Friday, July 1, 2016, at Renfrew Park Community Centre, Youth Celebrate Canada Day will once again host a spectacular celebration to commemorate Canada’s birthday.

This youth-organized event features fabulous performers of all cultures. There will be many exciting activities to do at the event, so bring your family and friends for a fun and lively time filled with entertainment! From arts and craft to food stands to games, there are many ways for people from all ages to participate in the event.

The fun festivities will start at 1:00 pm and will continue throughout the afternoon at Renfrew Park (at East 22nd Avenue and Renfrew), so come join along with everyone to celebrate Canada Day!