Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Windermere students call for a crosswalk at 27th and Nootka

27th-Ave-Nootka-Crosswalk

Windermere students are calling for a crosswalk to be installed at 27th Avenue and Nootka. Photo by Julie Cheng

BY COCO ASCHMANN-CROSS

Grade 9 students at Windermere Secondary are petitioning for a much-needed crosswalk at 27th Avenue and Nootka.

Windermere high school is situated halfway between Rupert Street and Nootka Street and stretches from 24th to 27th avenues. The buses run up and down on both Rupert and Nootka streets, delivering a great number of students to Windermere.

The number 16 bus on Nootka stops at 23rd, 25th and 27th avenues. However, there are only crosswalks on 22nd and 29th, both of which require a detour of several blocks when walking from the bus stop to the school. As a result, most kids cross the street without a crosswalk to save time to get to class.

The students’ petition asks for a new crosswalk at the bus stop of 27th Avenue and Nootka so students and teachers can have a safe and direct connection between the bus and the school.

The crosswalk would also benefit the people who take the SkyTrain and often walk down the ravine to avoid walking beside the busy road. This new proposed crosswalk would mirror a crosswalk on 27th Avenue and Rupert and also creates a safe and efficient corridor.

You can show your support by signing the students’ petition. They have created print petitions and an online one at https://www.change.org/p/adrian-dix-cross-walk-for-27th-ave-and-nootka-st-in-vancouver.

Coco Aschmann-cross is a Grade 9 student currently attending Windermere Secondary.

Copyright 2020 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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January 2020 issue of RCC News is here

RCC News January 2020

Happy new year! This issue of the RCC News full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Nominations open for Chris Taulu Community Excellence Award
  • Windermere students call for a crosswalk at 27th and Nootka
  • The Other Guy’s Opinion: A 2020 vision
  • Space available at Democratic Nature School for ages 5-9
  • Actions to save the planet together
  • Plus, the Collingwood Neighbourhood House Winter 2020 Recreation insert

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the February 2020 issue is January 10.

We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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Eating Out in RC: Ham and Eggman’s

Mexican-scramble-Ham-and-Eggmans

The Mexican Scramble. I cannot say enough about how good this was, including those Kennebec hash browns. The best! Photo by Paul Reid

Ham & Eggman’s
3883 Rupert Street, Vancouver
(604) 620-8942
hamandeggmans.com
Monday to Friday 8 am – 3 pm
Saturday to Sunday 9 am – 3 pm

BY PAUL REID

Ham & Eggman’s; Ham & Eggman’s – it’s kind of fun to say. Better yet is how good it tastes. Yes RC, we have a winner!

Ham & Eggman’s is producing some seriously good breakfast dishes right here in our community.

And it’s about time. Where else really has one been able to go around here for a really good breakfast(?) Since the Dutch Pannekoek House, which later morphed into James’ Street Cafe left the area, there really hasn’t been much in the way of dedicated breakfast places. And this one rocks!

Yes folks, not only was I there, tasting for myself, but I have found since that the internet too is full of nothing but rave reviews for Ham & Eggman’s.

Let’s see here what I can agree with. One person says, “My new go to breakfast spot in Vancouver!” Yes, I could definitely see that.

“The bathrooms were spotless!,” says another. Yes, I did get a chance to review those as well and they were noticeably being kept very clean.

“Right from the start, service was exceptional.” Yes, I too, undercover of course, was highly impressed by the pleasant mood and attentiveness of the wait staff.

“Chef Kristian Leidig really knows what he’s doing!” says Paniz L. Yes! Yes! In fact, doing
a little research on Chef Kristian and I find that he is quite the chef. He was presented the Vancouver Foodster 1st Place Award for his Bratwurst Benny in the #EggsBenedictChallengeYVR. Of course he did.

I’m telling you RC, these guys came to play ball.

Ham & Eggman’s has been here in RC since March 2019. Wow! Why was I the last to know? And if you haven’t been to Ham & Eggman’s yet, well, now you know that you better get yourself down there.

Before I let you go, I want to tell you about what I had. I went for the Mexican scramble. All their scrambles come with three eggs served with Kennebec hash browns and toast. The Mexican included house-made chorizo, fajita peppers and onions, aged cheddar, topped with salsa and sour cream ($15).

Let me tell you it was worth every last red cent. I guess the kids don’t know what a cent is. We used to call them pennies. I feel old.

Anyhow, get down to Ham & Eggman’s and taste for yourself. And tell me what you think of these Kennebec hash browns. I would not be going out on much of a limb by saying that these hash browns are likely the best you or I have ever tasted: light and fluffy on the inside, yet nice and crispy on the outside. I was wondering how they do that. How do you do that Kristian?

Thank you Ham & Eggman’s. Bon appetit!

Copyright 2019-2020 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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December 2019 issue of RCC News is here

RCC News December 2019

This issue of the RCC News full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Proposed 32-storey and library development at 5163-5187 Joyce Street: Open House
  • Thanks to contributors, advertisers and distributors for a successful 2019
  • Eating Out: Ham and Eggman’s
  • The inspiring story of Fred and Lisa Pan
  • Eco-corner: Vancouver ban on foam takeout containers starts January
  • Christmas is Vince Prasad’s favourite time of year
  • Gift ideas with a lifetime of benefits
  • The Other Guy’s Opinion by Robert F. Edwards

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the January 2020 issue is December 5, a few days earlier because of the holiday season.

We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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Eco-corner: Get ready for the Vancouver ban on plastic straws in spring 2020

You can choose from a wide range of reusable straws. Photo by Julie Cheng

BY JULIE CHENG

“No straw, please.”

Instead, I ask for a long metal spoon for my smoothie, and it goes down just fine.

This request has been a habit of mine for the past year as I geared up for the City of Vancouver’s straw ban when it was scheduled to go in effect in June 2019 as part of its Single-Use Item Reduction Strategy.

To my disappointment, that deadline was postponed.

Now city staff is supposed to present a by-law to council by November 30, 2019, to ban plastic straws beginning April 2020.

The by-law will include an exception for accessibility needs, including patients in hospitals and community care facilities who require the use of bendable plastic straws.

The problem with straws

According to the City of Vancouver, plastic straws and stir sticks make up about 3% of the city’s shoreline litter and negatively impact marine life and the environment.

Plastic straws can fall through screens on recycling sorting lines so they can’t be recycled. Even straws that are marked biodegradable or compostable are considered contaminants and are not accepted in the Vancouver’s Green Bin program.

Reusable options

Earth911’s handy chart shows alternatives to single-use straws. Source: earth911.com/food/straw-alternatives

Nowadays there are all kinds of different options for reusable straws, from glass to bamboo to stainless steel. They come in all sizes – you can get fat ones for your bubble tea as well as short ones for your cocktail that double well as a compact travel straw.

Check out Nada (Broadway and Fraser), Soap Dispensary (Main and 21st Avenue) and the Cook Culture (downtown) for their selection of reusable straws.

The best option is to just say no.

Julie Cheng is the editor of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Collingwood Corner: A brief history of Connaught School 1913–1932

Bayley’s claim with house at 650 Rupert Street and school beside it. Could this be the schoolhouse on the lower fields of Grenfell School that Loretta Houben’s dad remembers? Source: Vancouver Archives

BY LORETTA HOUBEN

For quite a while I’ve been fascinated with old school buildings, and Sir Wilfred Grenfell School is no exception. The school opened on December 3, 1958 and recently celebrated its 60th anniversary, but when I attended its hallowed halls from 1965 to 1973, it was quite new.

However, behind the cement structure that faces Wellington Avenue there is a much older building made of wood. According to the BC Directories online, John Norquay Annex was at this location from 1933 to 1955, showing the annex located at Price and Rupert.

From 1913 to 1932, another school was located here, on the lower section. A steep set of stairs leads from the upper level where the present school buildings are, to the bottom where there is a large empty playing field.

When I attended the school, there were two sets of stairs. My dad remembers long ago in the 1940s that there was a schoolhouse on the lower fields.

Recently I decided to investigate. I checked out the Vancouver School Board website (www.blogs.vsb.bc.ca/heritage) where there are many old photos of Vancouver schools, and noticed that to date, there were no photos of Connaught School, which was the name of the first school at that location.

I recalled that I had seen a photo of Rupert School in the Vancouver Archives. Could this be Connaught School? By patient searching in the BC Directories, and by looking at Rupert Street from 1913 onwards, I verified that Rupert School was located near Price Street on Rupert.

The school appears in two photos under the name “Bayley’s Claim.” I assume this is referring to Charles W. Bayley, who lived at #650 Rupert, and his house is in the photos next to Rupert School. There’s also another photo showing the odd numbered houses across Rupert Street, also in Bayley’s Claim.

Connaught School was named for the Duke of Connaught, Prince Arthur William Patrick Albert (1850–1942), Governor General of Canada and brother of King Edward VII.

The 1913 BC Directory states that Euphemia C. Jones was the principal. In 1913 she lived at 1848 7th Avenue.

Besides studying the streets in the directories, you can also look up names of people and see their occupations next to their address and name. Euphemia Jones was only 21 years old but due to the drastic increase in population growth, schools were expanding rapidly.

Using my Ancestry membership, I looked up the Jones family. On the 1911 Canadian census, I found Euphemia living with her parents in Vancouver at age 19. She was a teacher earning $860 per year. Euphemia married in 1915, and most likely that was the end of her teaching career.

Back to Bayley’s claim. After studying old Vancouver maps until I was quite googly eyed, I examined the Goads Fire Insurance map from 1912. Zooming in closely I discovered pay dirt!

Closeup of Price and Rupert area from 1912, showing a drawing of the school and house. Photo source: Goads Fire Insurance Map

The school is on the lower grounds facing Rupert, formerly called Collingwood Road, with Charles Bayley’s house to the right of it. I assume the buildings across the road are the rest of the claim.

Connaught School photos haven’t been found until now because they are named incorrectly in the archives!

The houses on Rupert Street were renumbered in 1930. By closely matching the names of the occupants with the old and new set of numbers, I noticed that #650 changed to 4530, which was vacant in 1930, and gone in 1931. Could this be the time frame that the second school building on the upper ground, made of wood, was built and renamed John Norquay Annex?

Of the four houses across the street, 4535 Rupert was built in 1912 (formerly 665) and 4543 Rupert was built in 1910 (formerly 657). This is according to the BC Assessments online.
When you go past the corner of Price and Rupert, maybe you can imagine it in your mind’s eye, and hear Miss Euphemia Jones ringing the school bell, and wonder why Charles Bayley purchased a claim at that corner.

I believe I’ve solved the Connaught School photo mystery and learned quite a bit more about the Collingwood area.

Loretta Houben has lived in the Collingwood area for more than 54 years and receives extreme satisfaction at solving local historical mysteries.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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November 2019 issue of RCC News is here

This issue of the RCC News full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Collingwood Corner: History of Connaught School
  • Legion update Grandview Collingwood branch and Remembrance Day photos
  • CNH Annex marks one-year anniversary
  • 3-1-1 and VanConnect keeps neighbourhood clean
  • New rental housing for seniors to open 2020
  • Going to see Greta
  • Eco-corner: Ban on plastic straws

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the December 2019 issue is November 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.