Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Eating Out in RC: Boteca Brasil

Boteca-Brasil

The bright and festive atmosphere of Boteca Brasil will transport you to someplace warm and cozy. Photos by Paul Reid

2545 Nanaimo Street, Vancouver

Call 778-379-7995 for reservations

Open Tuesday to Sunday for lunch and dinner

BY PAUL REID

Even on a dark and rainy Vancouver day, the bright and festive atmosphere of Boteca Brasil will transport you to someplace warm and cozy. And if you are thinking of where to take your sweetie this upcoming Valentine ’s Day, Boteco Brasil will fit that romantic bill.

In Brazil, a “boteco” is place where you go for delicious food, lots of drinks, good music and hang out with friends. Boteco Brasil is where you can do just that – just what the RC area needs! On some nights your dinner at Boteco will be accompanied with live music . You will enjoy some classics of the “música popular Brasileira” (well known as MPB), bossa nova, pop, pagode, samba and many classics of Brazilian music.

Yes, it was a rainy Sunday afternoon when my accomplice and I made this visit to Boteco. No live music at this time, but there was music and as mentioned, our spirits were uplifted, not only by the atmosphere, but by the friendly staff. I’ll add here too, during the sunnier months, one can sit outside on Boteco’s large patio – sweet as well. Probably Renfrew-Collingwood’s best patio.

Back inside, we ordered some drinks. There are lots of fine ones to choose from: a variety of bottled beer, draft beer, wines and some cool-sounding cocktails. There is Cachaçam a Brazilian distilled spirit made from sugar cane. Also Caipirinha, Brazil’s national cocktail, made with cachaça, sugar and lime. So what did we two wild and crazy kids order? It was an orange juice for her and a Brazilian roasted coffee for me.

Boteca-Brasil-Bobo-de-Camarao

The Bobo de Camarao is made of seasoned shrimps on a creamy stew made with red palm oil, cassava, coconut milk, celery and bell peppers.

For the food, the accomplice ordered the Bobo de Camarao ($17): seasoned shrimps on a creamy stew made with red palm oil, cassava, coconut milk, celery and bell peppers. I was drawn to the Feijoada ($16): authentic Brazilian style black beans and pork stew served with basmati rice, sautéed kale, farofa, vinaigrette salsa and a slice of orange. We also ordered an appetizer of Coxinhas ($9) which are crispy potato-based dough pockets stuffed with shredded chicken and spices.

The Coxinhas arrived, along with a garlic infused sauce, and mmm, no wonder these are described as Brazil’s favourite snack – really nice and tasty. The Bobo de Camarao, which my accomplice was sweet enough to allow me to try, was equally impressive. The coconut taste of the sauce reminded me of some Thai dishes I have eaten.

My Feijoada was also good. As with everything else, you could tell that it had been prepared with love and all fresh ingredients. I wasn’t exactly sure how to go about arranging it all. Our very pleasant host explained that the farofa, which I would later learn is a toasted cassava flour mixture used on barbacued meat and hearty stews, can be sprinkled on top.

So basically, you can mix it all together, and boy, and girl, was it good – very nice and filling. I barely had room to finish off the accomplice’s Bobo de Camarao.

Now, it would be time for dessert, but as you now know – we were too full for dessert, BUT, there were some nice-sounding ones: Bolo Prestigio ($6) a rich Brazilian chocolate and coconut cake with “beijino filling and brigadeiro” topping. Also, Pudim De Leite Moca ($6) A rich and creamy flan topped with caramel sauce.

So there we have it – Boteco Brasil would be a good choice to take your sweetie, on Valentine’s, or any time, lunch or dinner. Until next time food fans – bon appetite.

Copyright (c) 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

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February 2018 issue of RCC News is here

Happy Chinese new year! There is much to celebrate: Renfrew-Collingwood Community News will be 20 years old in 2019 and we will commemorate this milestone by revisiting some of the memorable community submissions over the years.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Get Involved page: Next info session on homeless housing at 4410 Kaslo, Feb. 6
  • INTERactive: A Valentine gift to get every heart pumping
  • Celebrating RCC News 20 Years: Strong Women
  • Collingwood Corner: The changing face of Joyce Street
  • Seniors and income tax
  • How to keep your new year’s resolution
  • Eating Out in RC: Boteco Brasil
  • History: Letter from 1958

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the March 2018 issue is February 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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Eating Out in RC: Pho 99 Broadway Tech Centre

2915 Hebb Avenue (at Renfrew)
604-255-3135

BY PAUL REID

Pho 99's Combo Roll plate. Photos by Paul Reid

Pho 99’s Combo Roll plate. Photos by Paul Reid

Greetings food fans. Let me tell you about one of the newer eateries in town, just opened on Easter of 2017. This is definitely the most modern pho restaurant that I have ever encountered. When later talking with manager and franchise owner, Mr. Khanh Tran, he explained to me, “There has been a change in philosophy with our generation, compared to the baby boomers before us.

“They would just cook the food and not pay much attention to the dining area. Now, the new generation wants to create an ambience and the atmosphere, to give the customer a full dining experience, one that is comfortable and relaxed.”

Seafood Noodle in Hot and Sour Soup

Seafood Noodle in Hot and Sour Soup

And that it was. My accomplice and I shared a Combo Roll plate ($7): one salad roll, a fried roll and a grilled minced pork roll. It comes with two delicious sauces. Mmm. I also ordered a large Seafood Noodle in Hot and Sour Soup ($10): with vegetables, squid, prawns and crabmeat. My accomplice had a small pho with chicken meat ($9).

The food arrived swiftly and I will just say that everything was oh-so delicious. Loved it!

Tran explained more about the pho-losophy. This is a meal about balance. All of the ingredients that you put in to the pho soup are there to balance one another out. The crunchiness of the bean sprouts balances with the soft noodles; the lime helps to cut through the fat; the basil goes well with the beef aroma; the hoisin sauce (that brown sauce on the table) can be added if you think the soup is too salty; the hot sauce and jalapenos are there for you to control the spiciness.

Pho 99’s broth takes a full 18 hours to get ready, which adds to that irresistible flavour. Yum!

Tran runs Pho 99 Broadway with his wife, his brother-in-law, Quy, and the full support of his entire family.

“This is Pho 99’s 10th location,” says Tran, “11 if you count the U.S. location,” Tran’s first restaurant.

A local hit with the students and staff of Broadway Tech Centre, Tran hopes to bring the best service and food that they can to our community.

“For us, the bottom line is the people. Did they have a great experience. In our culture, it is the honourable thing to give your guests the best that we can, to treat them as best as we can, and that is our philosophy here.”

Helping out the local community is also very important to Tran and his family, who were among the Vietnamese boat people forced to flee Vietnam. “We have begun working with a local nearby church, St. Jude’s, as well as to provide local high school graduates with ‘celebration vouchers’ for a job well done. We look forward to when the new business becomes more sustainable so that we will be better equipped to help our community even more.”

I suggest you visit Pho 99 and experience the new generation of pho restauarants for yourself. Bon appetit!

Copyright (c) 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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City plans housing for homeless residents at 4410 Kaslo

TMH-4410-Kaslo

The paths around the current garden at 4410 Kaslo are heavily used by commuters as a thoroughfare to the 29th Avenue SkyTrain station and bus loop. Photos by Julie Cheng

Community garden near the 29th Avenue SkyTrain station slated to become Vancouver’s latest site for temporary modular housing

BY JULIE CHENG

Dec. 13, 2017, local residents packed the First Hungarian Presbyterian Church in the first of two information sessions to find out more about the temporary modular housing that the City of Vancouver has planned for 4410 Kaslo Street.

Currently a community garden, 4410 Kaslo is located across from the 29th Avenue SkyTrain station and Slocan Park. One three-storey building with 50 units is being considered there as housing for people experiencing homelessness.

Kaslo is the city’s fourth site planned for such housing, following sites in the Marpole neighbourhood and on Franklin and Powell streets in the Downtown Eastside.

Together the four sites make up roughly 200 out of the 600 new units of temporary modular housing that the city aims to place across Vancouver. The city is working on six to seven more sites, according to Abi Bond, director of affordable housing community services.

TMH-community-info-session-2017-12-13

Jennifer Gray-Grant of the Collingwood Neighbourhood House and Chris Taulu of Collingwood Community Policing Centre were among the many community members who attended the 4410 Kaslo information sessions.

Vancouver’s first temporary modular housing at 220 Terminal Avenue opened in February 2017 and has been a “big success,” says Luke Harrison, CEO of the Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency. “It’s operating beautifully. There’s been no increase in crime. The residents have been good neighbours.”

Staff from Atira Women’s Resources Society will manage the Kaslo site and will connect its residents to support services such as health services.

Development permit timeline

December 13 and 14, 2017: Community information session to present project and gather feedback.

December 22, 2017: Public can provide input until December 22 via email (housing@vancouver.ca) or at the community information sessions.

January 2018: Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency applies for a development permit to build temporary modular housing at 4410 Kaslo Street.

January to February 2018: City and community partners hold another community information session to present the project and listen to feedback. Public has the opportunity to provide input for one week after the community information session via email (housing@vancouver.ca) or at the community information session.

February 2018: The city’s director of planning determines whether a development permit will be issued.

Spring 2018: Once approved, it takes about three months for construction to be completed.

For more information visit Vancouver.ca/temporarymodularhousing.

Current City of Vancouver temporary modular housing projects

Franklin Street – 39 units on a 18,913 square-foot lot

Powell Street – 39 units on a 21,203 square-foot lot

Marpole – 2 buildings of 39 units; total 78 units on a 65,198 square-foot lot

Kaslo Street – 50 units on a 20,139 square-foot lot

The building sizes for Franklin, Powell and Marpole are about 15,000 square feet for each 39-unit structure, according to Luke Harrison of the Vancouver Affordable Housing Agency. The building planned for Kaslo would be closer to 25,000 square feet.

Did you know?
The 2017 Homeless Count in Metro Vancouver reports more than 2,100 people living in homeless shelters or on the street within Vancouver.


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Windermere Law 12 students learn about housing and homelessness crisis at Housing Justice Conference

Windermere Secondary Law 12 classes attended their first Housing Conference. Photo by Maya Cindrich

Windermere Secondary’s Housing Justice Conference 2017

BY MAYA CINDRICH

On Nov. 20, the Windermere Secondary Law 12 classes attended their very first school-organized Housing Conference of 2017.

Key speakers, such as anti-poverty and social justice activist Jean Swanson, gave detailed presentations about Vancouver’s ever-rising homelessness epidemic and what the students as youth, could do to put an end to homeless.

The conference began with a presentation by Jean Swanson, who covered a wide array of topics that tie into Vancouver’s massively increasing homelessness population, such as the $41,000 tax decrease on the wealthy since the 1970s, and the decrease in social housing and inadequate funding from the provincial and federal governments.

Jean also pressed the importance of decisions that will affect our future with housing for the better, saying, “If we can get a man to the moon, why can’t we end homelessness?” Jeans stated simple facts that would inevitably end homeless such as bringing back higher taxes on the wealthy, providing more social housing opportunities and, of course, gaining rent control.

The second part to the conference consisted of students picking their own presentations to attend, according to their own interests. Going with the housing theme, I was the most interested in the presentation about Tiny Homes and Co-op Housing, given by Samantha Gambling and Fiona Jackson.

With the help of these two women, our group of students learned about all the possible aids to not just lower class homelessness as we see it, but our suffering middle class as well. Samantha gave a detailed presentation of her life as a woman owning and living in an affordable, sustainable and ecofriendly tiny home on wheels, and the challenges and the rewards.

I got to learn about zoning –which is a term that basically means what can be built on a piece of land or lot – that I hadn’t known about before. I also got to learn about the eco-friendly alternatives that come with living in a tiny home, for example, “humanure.” Samantha showed us a photograph of her toilet that had been altered to spit up solid and liquid waste, where it could then be sterilized in a bin outside for farming purposes. For me, that piece of information was interesting but wasn’t the highlight of our time together.

Fiona Jackson, however, gave a presentation on co-op housing and the benefits that come with being a part of a non-profit organization. With her, we got a more thorough look into co-ops. We learned about the democratic and business approach to co-op housing, where everyone “aims to break even.” She spoke about the different co-ops in Vancouver, and the ones being built as I’m sitting here typing this. For a short moment she even indulged into the history of co-ops, letting us know that the very first recorded existence of one was in Rochdale England, 1849.

All this brings up the pressing question: is housing a commodity or a human right? Personally, I can give a definitive answer to this question. It would simply be facts against beliefs. I believe it should be seen as a basic human necessity. No one in this world should sleep without a roof over their head, or not have a place to come home to.

Nevertheless, my eyes are still open to the fact that as of now housing is in fact a commodity. Until a real change occurs, whether that be in the form of higher taxes on the wealthy or gaining rent control, housing will continue to be a game of status. A show of sorts. A gamble for the poor, but a game for the wealthy.

Maya Cindrich is a Grade 12 student attending Windermere Secondary. She aims to better her knowledge of our justice system and one day become someone that makes a change, however big or small.

Homelessness addressed at Windermere Housing Justice Conference

Jean-Swanson-Housing-Conference

At the Windermere Housing Justice Conference held on Nov. 20, guest speaker and activist Jean Swanson proposed that the government introduce a mansion tax. Photo by Veronica Kong

BY VERONICA KONG

The Vancouver Housing crisis has affected many individuals who are currently homeless in Vancouver. So how can we work towards ending homelessness?

At the Windermere Housing Justice Conference held on Nov. 20, Guest speaker and activist Jean Swanson proposed that the government introduce a mansion tax. With this progressive property tax, we could end homelessness in a year. The mansion tax would bring in an extra $174 million annually, which could be used to build 2,138 modular homes for each counted homeless person in Vancouver. The cost of building the modular homes would only cost $160 million, which will take less than one year of revenue from the mansion tax.

There are other ways that we can deal with the housing crisis. Co-op housing and tiny houses can also contribute to ending homelessness.

In co-op housing, the members own the co-op, but the co-op owns the housing. Therefore, rent and other housing factors are voted on between the members. This means that the members work together to keep their housing well-managed and affordable.

Another alternative housing option are tiny houses. These houses are fully functional, customizable and has the capacity to be moved to other locations. The tiny houses are designed and built on the principles of affordability, community and sustainability. The downside to tiny houses is that they are currently not legal in Vancouver.

Homelessness affects many individuals in health and other factors. We should not treat housing as a game for the rich when it causes others to suffer. Housing is a human right and should not be taken away from us.

Veronica Kong is a Law 12 student at Windermere Secondary. She is currently trying to raise awareness on  such issues as homelessness and housing justice.

Windermere Secondary hosts housing conference

BY VINCENT WU

“If we can put people on the moon, why can’t we end homelessness.”

This was an amazing quote by keynote speaker and Order of Canada recipient Jean Swanson at Windermere’s Housing Conference on Nov. 20, 2017.

During the brief hour we heard her speak, she discussed the present and future of housing in Vancouver. Did you know in the 1970s over 760 social housing units were built every year, but now the number has decreased to only 11?

Back then welfare was more than enough to be able to survive. Now, welfare only supplies $710 per month, which is not enough to even rent a one-room apartment. One of the main reasons for this was because taxes on the richest one percent have decreased by $41,000 since the 1970s.

To combat this situation, Swanson has lobbied for a mansion tax. This tax would increase property taxes of houses ranging from $5 to 10 million by one percent and houses over $10 million by two percent. This would end homelessness within one year.

The next presenter, 23-year-old co-founder of City Hive Tessica Troung, showed that Vancouver was no longer affordable. In order to save enough money for a 20 percent down payment of a house in 1976, it would take five years. Compared to today, it would take over 25 years. Studies show millennials earn $8,000 less than their parents even though they have more education. Vancouver housing is a real problem that we need to solve.

Vincent Wu is active in the community. He was one of the marketing and promotion managers for Youth Celebrate Canada Day 2017.

Housing: Why you should care and how you can fix it

BY DYLAN LE

Imagine being evicted out of your home and forced to move. Your new neighbourhood doesn’t have any grocery stores, Skytrain stations or community centres nearby, but it’s the best you can afford. Now let that happen to you again and again, until you’re dwindled down to nothing, leaving you homeless.

The situation I just described is that of gentrification. It is a term used to describe affluent people moving in historically less wealthy neighbourhoods. Gentrification is closely associated to capitalism, which is the economic and political system for the private ownership of goods and services with the objective to accumulate more wealth. Capitalism and gentrification are two prime issues that leave many in the Lower Mainland homeless.

Why does gentrification happen and how do landlords profit from it? By evicting your tenants, you can legally raise the price of rent however high you want. How many times can you be evicted, and rent be increased until there is nowhere you can stay?

Capitalism can be found in Vancouver’s Chinatown. To cater to the wealthier residents, more and more coffee shops are opening up. However, the majority of locals, especially long-time residents, in Chinatown are less interested in coffee shops and prefer traditional stores. This hurts the culture of Chinatown and the community that the locals have built.

(For more information visit https://chinatownaction.org)

5 responses to Vancouver’s housing crisis

Regulation

  • Higher taxes for real estate speculators
  • Limit foreign ownership

Using Public Powers and Assets

  • Community land trust
  • Transit-oriented development
  • Inclusionary zoning

Yes in My Backyard

  • Support shelters being built in your neighbourhood

Support Renters

  • Encourage new rental investments
  • Protect renters’ rights
  • Stop home ownership bias

Vote for Housing

  • Pay attention to the news show support for an affordable housing market.

Become aware of the issues in the housing market and how we can respond to it. We can bring Vancouver’s housing crisis to an end.

Housing rally: More action needed to address housing crisis

Housing rally

The November 2017 housing rally was hosted by the Vancouver Tenants Union, Chinatown Action Group and Carnegie Community Action Program. Photo by Jordan Gammon-Fischer

BY JANICE ZENG

The housing rally on Nov. 25, 2017, was a great opportunity to take action in regards to the housing crisis.

When I arrived, a speaker was talking about the purpose of National Housing Day. It is a day on the calendar, but it is not a holiday. Nobody says “Happy National Housing Day,” for it is not a day to celebrate. It is a serious day for social justice and action regarding housing.

The speaker talked about how, last year, many people ended up on the streets around Hastings. Many tents were put up, which lead to the police arresting 700 people. Homelessness is not a crime, and jailing people that are already in a difficult living situation is cruel.

After the speakers, it was time to grab a poster and begin the rally. Leading the rally were people wearing ponchos that spell out “10,000 In Social Housing Every Year For BC.” Many posters were in Chinese as the situation with Chinatown was a big issue discussed that day.

During the march, we chanted, “Get up, Get down, There’s a housing movement in this town,” “The people united will never be defeated,” “What’s our housing strategy? 10,000 homes in BC,” “What do we want? Housing! When do we want it? Now! (we also said the same phrase in Chinese),” and “We are ready to fight, housing is a human right.”

There was a lot of passion and anger in the people’s voices. As we marched, we passed by many homeless people and tents – that just adds volume to what we’re advocating for.

We heard more speakers at the end of the march. First up was Jean Swanson and it was very nice to hear her talk again. She is very passionate about housing, she has dissected the recently released national housing strategy. The context of the document is very disappointing, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is not taking appropriate actions towards the cause.

Swanson explained that this “housing strategy” is nothing but a re-election strategy for the Liberal party. What I found most upsetting was their definition of affordable. The plan defines affordable as “30% of units having rents at or less than 80% of median market rents, for a minimum of 20 years.”

One example that Swanson gave was if the median rent is $2,000 per month, 80% of it would be $1,600. Thus, you would need to make $65,000 a year to afford rent. How is that remotely affordable when the average salary in Vancouver is only $56,000?

Afterwards, we had an activist part of the Chinatown movement come speak. I didn’t get to go to the Chinatown workshop, so it was nice getting to learn about it during the rally. The speaker told us about an empty lot and described it as the heart of Chinatown. The lot was the battleground where development plans  have been defeated by a coalition of the city’s most marginalized people – not just once, but five times. The speaker said that they have won the battle, but they have not officially won until the empty lot can become a home for the most marginalized and hard working people of society.

The final presentation was directed against Justin Trudeau. They prepared a dummy with a printed picture of Trudeau’s face attached to it. The speaker displayed a giant poster and began educating Trudeau. She took him back to school about the definition of affordability and the basics of problem solving. The audience had a nice laugh and it was an entertaining way to end the event.

Janice Zeng is a Grade12 student at Windermere Secoundary. She attended the Housing Rally to have her voice heard and hear from fascinating activists.

“Nobody says ‘Happy National Housing Day,’ for it is not a day to celebrate. It is a serious day for social justice and action regarding housing.”


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January 2018 issue of RCC News is here

Renfrew-Collingwood Community News January 2018

Happy new year! There is much to celebrate: 2018 also marks the 20th anniversary of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

This issue of the RCC News is full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood!

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Has it been 20 years? Renfrew-Collingwood Community News 20th anniversary
  • Happy Corner Preschool: Where learning is play
  • More action needed to address housing crisis
  • Housing for homeless residents planned for 4410 Kaslo Street
  • Seniors and kids at Three Links Care Centre
  • Family Literacy Day is January 27
  • The neighbours who support Still Moon Arts Society. You can, too!
  • Community kitchen dishes up friendship and food
  • New bike parkade at Joyce-Collingwood SkyTrain station
  • Collingwood Neighbourhood House winter 2018 programs

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the February 2018 issue is January 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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Read On! Vibrant Collingwood mural depicts the neighbourhood’s past, present and future

Collingwood Wall mural

There is a colourful new mural on McHardy St. and Vanness Avenue in the neighbourhood of Renfrew-Collingwood. Photo by Bert Monterona

BY TONY WANLESS

Anyone who walks, bikes or drives regularly near the transit line on Vanness Avenue in Collingwood East of Rupert Street and toward the Joyce-Collingwood Skytrain station is familiar with the dreary and uninspiring cement wall that extends along the south side of the street beside the transit tracks.

For a long time the dispiriting, 26-metre-long wall had been a neglected, colourless strip of banality. Over time, the wall became covered with graffiti.

Today, there is a wildly colourful mural extending along the whole length of the wall. A brightly painted kaleidoscope of swirls and drawings and affirmative words, the Collingwood Wall embraces the neighbourhood with its multicoloured hues and swirls and whirls and drawings.

In the process, it also provides passersby with a tableau of the area’s history, from its beginnings as a wilderness with rivers teeming with salmon and other fish, of Indigenous people’s lives and of the migrations of people from around the world who now make Collingwood the varied, multicultural neighbourhood it is.

In a sense, it is a 26-metre story about how we came to be. These depictions of history and historical life enliven the entire street and SkyTrain track – passengers commuting to or from the suburbs are inevitably drawn to train windows as the riot of colours flash by – and refreshes the views so much that walkers often stop in their tracks so they can study the mural more closely.

Designed by noted Filipino, and, of late, Vancouver, muralist Norberto “Bert” Monterona, the mural was painted over the summer by members of the Collingwood Neighbourhood House (CNH) youth group.

It wasn’t an easy task.

At first, the wall had to be repainted a basic white to cover over the grafitti that marred its entire length. Then outlines of the myriad forms and scenes in the mural – Monterona’s designs are known for their intricate, almost abstract, forms that often tell stories about the people who live there – had to be carefully outlined.

This outlining took some time, and for several weeks, passersby would stop and study it all, twisting their necks as they clearly tried to make out what was going on with “that wall.”

Now they know. It’s a storyboard about where they live, a pictoral history of what the area once was, now is and what it is rapidly becoming – a rapid-growing, vibrant neighbourhood that often has the feeling of a small town but is, in fact, becoming a modern-city multicultural centre.

Read On Dec2017 Word Search

Download the word search.

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News