Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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December 2018 issue of RCC News is here

Renfrew-Collingwood Community News December 2018

Happy holidays! This issue of the RCC News is full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Sarah Ross House open house
  • RCC News 20 years: Collingwood Neighbourhood House moves from Kingsway to Joyce
  • Ages and Stages intergenerational project
  • Read On: Beating the winter blues
  • Windermere Climate Change Conference: The world is in your hands
  • Vancouver Christian School honours soldiers of Renfrew Heights
  • Year-end tax planning
  • The Other Guy’s Opinion: Glad to be a welcoming Canadian

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the January 2019 issue is December 5. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.

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Read On: Beating the winter blues

BY TONY WANLESS

Doctors have long understood that, in these months, most people begin to feel sad, less energetic, quieter and, often, sleepier.

Our moods aren’t as cheerful as they were in the summer. Life seems more difficult. Happiness has gone.

In Vancouver, this end-of-the-year sadness is stronger. The dark, cold, rainy days and constant gloom make many people feel tired and glum.

These feelings are often called the “blahs” or “The Blues” – like in the songs about trouble and heartache.

Because our bodies need light to create the chemicals in our brains that make us happy or energetic, we often feel sad and unhappy, more tired, and, sometimes, hopeless, in the darkest times of the year.

But not everyone is affected by the year-end blues. Some people live through the period with few problems while others are so sad they want to pull a blanket over their heads until springtime.

This last feeling is more formally termed seasonal affective disorder (SAD) – a form of mental illness caused by a lack of light.

Doctors say that the best way to survive the year-end months is by being involved in activities like exercise and spending more time with friends and family.

These keep you energized during the dark period. Joyful activities produce chemicals in the brain that make you happy and so help beat the blues.

Also, most religions have created something to help the (mostly western) world survive the blues.

It’s called Christmas, which began as a religious ceremony in much of the Northern world as a way to cheer up people in the darkest time of year. Now, it is almost a month-long celebration that makes us happier.

So have a merry, happy Christmas, everyone. And try to remain cheerful.

Definitions

disorder: a state of confusion
affected: acted upon; influenced
formally: in accordance with the rules of convention or etiquette
western: living in or originating from the west, in particular Europe or the United States


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Family Tree Tips: Using Ancestry Library Edition at the Vancouver Public Library

BY LORETTA HOUBEN

The avid family tree researcher knows about ancestry.com or ancestry.ca. This is a powerful database with billions of genealogy documents stored online, accessible through an expensive membership unless purchased on sale. But are you aware that the ancestry site can be researched at your local library?

I attended a class to learn how to do this at the Collingwood Library in December 2018. Deanna from the Central Branch taught the hour and a half session. There were nine spots available, but only three people showed up that evening. We each were provided with a laptop to work with, and this made it easy to follow along as Deanna projected what she was doing onto a large screen.

Anyone with a library card can sign in to the computers available at the library. The Central Branch in downtown Vancouver has several computers with blue tags on top that can directly log into the Ancestry Library edition.

First you sign into Firefox, then add your library number and pin. Click the accept button, and then click on Digital Library, then choose Online Resources. Enter Ancestry Library Edition, then click on Find, then Access Now.

You will be able to search the census, vitals, military, immigration and quick links with member trees, birth, marriage and death records. Ancestry Library Edition includes most of the information found in a paid membership site, but the content is not exactly the same and some documentation might require paid membership to access. If you would like to know what databases are not included, the Central Branch has a printout for this, and other helpful printouts on tips for searching the Library Edition.

Deanna helped us navigate through some of the search pages by using the name John Smith. The class learned how to narrow down the different fields. For example, we explored the 1921 census for Canada. A map was shown under the search button, and we could click on it and narrow the search to a specific province.

When you discover a document you’d like to save, you can send the document home by email or add the information to a USB stick. I tried emailing and it was very easy to do.

The tips I learned were that if you do a broad or narrow search on names you will get a better result. Sometimes it’s difficult to find your ancestor’s name on a census, as the census takers often made up the surnames!

Another neat trick I learned was that the hammer and wrench tool on the side of an image means that if you click on it, you can print, download, rotate the image right or left, or flip horizontally!

Part of the database for the Ancestry Library Edition includes the 1851 to 1921 Census of Canada, US Border crossings from the US to Canada from 1908 to 1935, Canada City and Area Directories from 1819 to 1906, Canada Obituary Collection 1898 to 2015, Canada Ocean Arrivals 1919 to 1924 and Canadian Passenger Lists 1865 to 1935. To see the full list, pick up a printout at the Central Branch. The United Kingdom, England and Wales, Northern Ireland, Europe and the USA are also included.

To find out when the next Ancestry Library Edition class will be offered, search events on Vancouver Public Library online. The next one is Tuesday, January 15, 2019, at 6:30 pm until 8 pm.

I highly recommend taking a class. It will be like opening Pandora’s Box, and you will be surprised and delighted. You may also disappear down a rabbit hole or two for a few hours. Best of all, it’s free!

Loretta Houben is the author of the Family Tree Tips series published in the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

Copyright 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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November 2018 issue of RCC News is here

RCC News November 2018

This issue of the RCC News is full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood.

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • The Annex is open! CNH’s arts and culture hub
  • RCC News 20 years: Happy 100th birthday to John Harlow
  • #MeToo hits close to home: November 25 is the International Day for the Elimination
    of Violence against Women
  • Seniors bus trip to salmon hatchery and spawning grounds
  • Tips for leaving a legacy
  • Miss Wheelchair Canada 2018: Breaking beauty misconceptions

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the December 2018 issue is November 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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4 gardening tips for fall

Hydrangea

Do not be afraid to cut hydrangeas back quite drastically once they finish flowering. Photos by Julie Cheng

BY SOREN ELSAY

The days of tank tops and bare feet in the back yard have come to an end. However, as experienced gardeners know, garden work is a year-round process. While the spring and summer are where the excitement happens, what you do during the fall and winter plays just as crucial a role in your garden’s fortunes.

The conditions may be less than ideal for being outside, but make sure you find time to properly put your garden into hibernation mode by following these tips.

1. Plant bulbs

The best way to make sure springtime starts off with a bang is to plant bulbs in the fall. Aim for planting them from the middle of October until the end of November to see them emerge in full bloom in the spring. Make sure they are planted four to eight inches below the surface and most types, such as the ever-popular daffodils, should be planted in groups of five or more per hole.

Unfortunately, bulbs are a favourite treat of the local wildlife. Try deterring them by coating your bulbs in baby powder just before they get put in the ground.

Keep your bulbs dry at all costs while storing them. Wet bulbs tend to go bad very quickly. If a bulb is black or mushy, don’t put it in the ground and expect it to grow.

2. Cut down perennials

Perennials, as opposed to the one-season-and-done “annuals,” are plants that return every year. But that does not mean you let them wither and die though the winter. Cut down them down to the ground once they turn brown or begin to look unpleasant. They will be back.

Cut down perennials like peonies right to the ground once they turn brown.

3. Prune hydrangeas (if you have them)

Although brilliant when they flower throughout the summer, hydrangea bushes tend to get overgrown and hard to manage very quickly. To keep them under control, do not be afraid to cut them back quite drastically once they finish flowering. It’s not unheard of to prune it down to two-thirds or even one-half of its initial size. Always make your cut just above a fresh bud or at “crotch” (where a branch meets another branch).

4. Leave the leaves

Understandably most people like the tidy look of not having brown leaves scattered across their lawn; however, I would advise leaving or even putting a layer of leaves on top of your garden beds once the plants are done for the season. The leaves will provide both insulation against the cold for the bulbs still in the ground as well as an influx of nutrients as the leaves decompose over time.

Soren Elsay has worked as a professional landscaper. He is an aspiring writer with a bachelor of arts from the University of British Columbia.

Copyright 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Eating Out in RC: Zorro’s Pizza and Spaghetti House

Zorros-reopens

The man now behind Zorro’s, taking over the legacy, Wayne Bergquist. Photos by Paul Reid

4453 Boundary Road, Vancouver
Free delivery (after 4 pm)
Phone: 604-438-6446
Now accepts debit as well as cash

BY PAUL REID

Greetings food fans. I was very excited to review this next gem in that jewel-encrusted crown of RC eateries, Zorro’s Pizza and Spaghetti House. Yes! Zorro’s is back! Many of you already know, since it happened back in February – Zorro’s reopened!

Many were stunned and saddened by the passing of Tony Siliverdis, the man behind Zorro’s. The pizza became legendary. As RC’s Eating Out restaurant review guy, I was saddened to find myself having never tried it. The more I heard about how great it was, the more I regretted having never had the experience.

Alas! Wayne Bergquist and his mom, Cynthia Ostonal, have come to the rescue, apparently just in time. “When we contacted the Siliverdis family, we found that they had pretty much given up looking for someone to take over the business and were getting ready to sell everything at an auction.”

Thank goodness for Wayne and Cynthia. Short of building a time machine, there was no way for me to ever try a legendary slice of that Zorro’s pie.

The Jerry's Special lives up to all the hype.

The Jerry’s Special lives up to all the hype.

It’s the exact same menu. I had to have the legendary Jerry’s Special (named after Tony’s son). Bacon, salami, pepperoni, onion, mushrooms, olives, green peppers, pineapple, fresh tomatoes and lean beef.

I was not disappointed. My Jerry’s actually lived up to all that hype. It was old school: thick and delicious and I will definitely be back to try more. Now, as admitted, I never had a true one of Tony’s creations, so I cannot compare, but I can honestly say that I was very impressed. A deal at $22. Yes, this baby is so thick, one slice is pretty much a meal for some. I had about four of the eight because it was just so good and I was stuffed!

Wayne is using the exact same recipes for the dough. I found the crust to be like a freshly baked pastry – chewy, delicious and thick – but not too heavy. Even the thick crust at the end, which you often might leave behind, was good to the last bite.

Well done guys! Mikeal Hunt, Zorro’s new pizza chef, should be proud.

Zorros-chef

Zorro’s pizza chef Mikeal Hunt should be proud.

Wayne has been enjoying Zorro’s pizza since he was about 16 years old. He’s about 40 now, so that’s a lot of Zorro’s. Wayne knows how it should taste. “We’re making it the same, but we’re making it better,” he says. “Maybe a little less ‘wet.’ We’re also going to be adding some new pizza to the menu. We now have a Double Cheeseburger pizza and Sweet BBQ pizza.”

And what does Billy Hopeless of the Black Halos – (un)official ambassador of Zorro’s pizza, say? “My picture is up on the wall with Tony’s—that’s gotta say something. I only hope they can keep it as faithful as they have to the legacy they are carrying on as there has never been a better pizza than Zorro’s. If I wasn’t so busy planning my next attack with the reunited Black Halos and living in Gastown so far away from my old hood, I’d probably have jumped in to keep the old oven cooking.”

Well friends, what are you waiting for? Get on the phone and get yourself one of the best deep dish pizzas. Bon appetit.

Comments from the RCC News website regarding Tony Siliverdis

Mr. Dunlop

Rest in peace, my friend, you will always be remembered as a great man with a beautiful family; hardworking and best pizza in Vancouver for sure. You delivered pizza to my family for 30 years. We will miss talking to you about anything and everything; going to miss you; love you.

J. Mihaichuk

My family home was up the street in the 70s to the late 90s. I was at Zorros Pizza way too much. I loved the family and of course the pizza was amazing. Still after all this time I remember the great man Tony was, always a smile, sometimes a glare, but always a person all of us could trust. He will be missed. I only wish I could have brought my kids to Zorro’s to meet the man, the Legend.

Len

I recently went to Zorro’s for pizza as I live out of town. I’m sorry for your loss as your father was a wonderfully kind human being. I worked shift throughout the early 1990s and would drop by for food to take to work and chat with your mom and dad. They were very kind people. I was pleased to be able to introduce my 8-year-old son to your father about a year ago and chatted like the old days. My son liked your father and your dad gave him a free can of pop. Your father was old school and will be sorrowfully missed. My son told everyone your father’s pizza was the best he ever tasted.

Read more about Tony Siliverdis of Zorro’s

Copyright 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Carleton School House: Green Thumb to the rescue

Theatre company campaigns to rebuild historic Collingwood school

Carleton School House

Patrick McDonald, artistic director of Green Thumb Theatre, unveiled drawings of how the Carleton School House could look as soon as the fall of 2012. Photos by Paul Reid

BY PAUL REID

To commemorate the 20-year anniversary of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News, we’re revisiting past stories that have particularly inspired us. This article was first published in October 2011.
My favourite story from the RCC News is about the Green Thumb Theatre. I like stories about local buildings being revitalized.
− Adena Lee

It looks as though the 115-year-old Carleton School House, which has been vacant and deteriorating since being gutted by fire in April 2008, will indeed be saved from the wrecking ball. The Green Thumb Theatre has come to a deal with the Vancouver school board to lease the building from the school board for 20 years as their new headquarters.

Green Thumb Theatre will need to raise approximately 1.2 million dollars to transform the currently burnt-out building into a restored version of its original self with two rehearsal halls, washrooms and a green room. The theatre company also plans to refurbish an adjacent building, “the barn”―built in 1908, to house its offices.

The theatre company creates and performs theatre works aimed at children, teens and young adults, to allow students to learn more about educational theatre programs. Green Thumb has had shows on Broadway and the Sydney Opera House, its works translated into 14 languages and plays performed by over 200 theatre companies throughout the world.

The Green Thumb solution came after much work by heritage advocates.

The capital campaign was launched at the Carleton site on September 13. Lead by Patrick McDonald, artistic director, speakers that day included Pat Munton, principal of Sir Guy Carleton Elementary School; Patti Bacchus, board chair of the Vancouver school board; Kerry Jang, City of Vancouver councillor; Donald Luxton, Heritage Vancouver; and Adrian Dix, leader of the BC New Democratic Party and our local MLA.

Bobbi Senft and Jackie McHugh

Also present were Bobbi Senft and Jackie McHugh. Longtime activists of local heritage protection, their family members have attended Carleton Elementary for five generations, since 1905.

All of the speakers were thrilled about the win-win partnership. “We’ll have a restored building, the community will have its heart back and we’ll have this fantastic theatre program,” said Patti Bacchus.

“We’re delighted because Green Thumb Theatre will be restoring our much-cherished heritage schoolhouse to its original splendour and beyond,” said Pat Munton, the school’s principal. “It’s just amazing, it brings tears to my eyes.”

Adrian Dix declared it a “wonderful day” and kicked off the campaign by donating $1,000.

Initially, Green Thumb hopes to receive $150,000 as part of a cultural infrastructure grant from the city. This would allow for the replacement of the roof, whose current tarps are covering a big hole. Green Thumb will also apply for $450,000 from the Department of Canadian Heritage.

This would leave $400,000 still to raise, an amount that Green Thumb is positive they can. If all goes to plan, the theatre company would be moving into the renovated school building by fall 2012.

Learn more about Green Thumb Theatre at greenthumb.bc.ca. You can also find Green Thumb on Facebook.

Copyright 2018 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News