Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Eco-corner: Get ready for the Vancouver ban on plastic straws in spring 2020

You can choose from a wide range of reusable straws. Photo by Julie Cheng

BY JULIE CHENG

“No straw, please.”

Instead, I ask for a long metal spoon for my smoothie, and it goes down just fine.

This request has been a habit of mine for the past year as I geared up for the City of Vancouver’s straw ban when it was scheduled to go in effect in June 2019 as part of its Single-Use Item Reduction Strategy.

To my disappointment, that deadline was postponed.

Now city staff is supposed to present a by-law to council by November 30, 2019, to ban plastic straws beginning April 2020.

The by-law will include an exception for accessibility needs, including patients in hospitals and community care facilities who require the use of bendable plastic straws.

The problem with straws

According to the City of Vancouver, plastic straws and stir sticks make up about 3% of the city’s shoreline litter and negatively impact marine life and the environment.

Plastic straws can fall through screens on recycling sorting lines so they can’t be recycled. Even straws that are marked biodegradable or compostable are considered contaminants and are not accepted in the Vancouver’s Green Bin program.

Reusable options

Earth911’s handy chart shows alternatives to single-use straws. Source: earth911.com/food/straw-alternatives

Nowadays there are all kinds of different options for reusable straws, from glass to bamboo to stainless steel. They come in all sizes – you can get fat ones for your bubble tea as well as short ones for your cocktail that double well as a compact travel straw.

Check out Nada (Broadway and Fraser), Soap Dispensary (Main and 21st Avenue) and the Cook Culture (downtown) for their selection of reusable straws.

The best option is to just say no.

Julie Cheng is the editor of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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Renfrew Ravine Moon Festival is back on September 14, 2019

Moon-Fest-2019-poster

BY ANGUS HO

The Moon Festival is back for its 17th year on Saturday, September 14, 2019! This family-friendly event in Renfrew-Collingwood will bring you tonnes of live music, entertainment, beautiful art displays, food and more, for a thoroughly enjoyable afternoon and evening.

Co-produced by Still Moon Arts Society and the Renfrew Park Community Association, the festival celebrates the harvest abundance and the full moon, while bringing to attention the natural beauty of Renfrew Ravine and Still Creek, which is one of the few remaining open stre ams with urban forest in the city.

Join us and over 5,000 other attendees from all over East Vancouver neighbourhoods to experience the transformation of the natural environment of the Renfrew Ravine into an enchanting scene of light, colour and music.

Pre-Moon Festival workshops

Come take part in public workshops offered throughout the month of September. Prior to the festival, you can make your own lanterns to help guide your way through the night, or learn how to make delicious mooncakes.

September 3 6: Arduino Lantern Workshop (5 8 pm) at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $100 (4 days)

Fee includes $65 supplies for electronics and lantern materials. Must bring your own laptop with pre-installed apps – registration and details on the website stillmoonarts.ca.

September 7: 5 8 pm: Mooncake Workshop at CNH Annex // $20

September 8: 10 am 1 pm: Mooncake Workshop at CNH Annex // $20

September 7 & 9: Fire and Water Lanterns at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $20 (2 days)

September 7: 1:30 4:30 pm

September 9: 4 7 pm

September 8 & 9: Mushroom Lanterns at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $25 (2 days)

September 8: 1:30 4:30 pm

September 9: 4 7 pm

September 10, 11, 12: Glass Jar Lanterns (4 7 pm) at Slocan Park Fieldhouse // $10 (1 day)

Moon Festival Schedule September 14

Harvest Fair: 4 – 7:30 pm @ Slocan Park

The Moon Festival kicks off with the Harvest Fair, a family-friendly festival featuring local musicians and performers, community organizations, food, games and activities, and a harvest competition where you can bring your homegrown crops to win prizes.

Twilight Lantern Walk: 7:30 – 8 pm

At sunset, attendees are encouraged to light their lanterns and join the parade, which is complete with live music and costumed participants. The parade will pass by various art installations and maybe even surprise performances until it reaches Renfrew Park.

Lantern Festival: 8 – 8:45 pm @ Renfrew Park

At Renfrew Park, witness the beauty of candlelight, exquisite lanterns, ethereal music and the shimmering Still Creek, with entertainment and food just outside of the ravine. The evening closes off with a finale spectacle featuring dancing, stilting, fire spinning and an explosion of light.

For more detailed information on the workshops, Moon Festival schedule, and accessibility, visit stillmoonarts.ca.

Cracks-in-Creeks-artists

Performers and organizers after the performance of Cracks in Creeks. (L to r) Isabelle Russell, Jenna Berlyn, Roxanna Wang, Red Fawkes, Marie Whimbey, Tasha Hillman, Carmen Rosen, Starr Muranko, Devan Pawa-Larsen, Bea Miller. Photo by Angus Ho

Cracks in Creeks: Final showcase at the CNH Annex on September 22

On August 11, a group of emerging artists performed a site-specific version of Cracks in Creeks: Live Streaming on the banks of Still Creek, as part of the Vines Art Festival. The performers embraced the natural sounds and beauty of the ravine in their surroundings, while the audience moved through the creekside space in Renfrew Park with the performers. Tea was served after the performance alongside a knowledge-sharing session about Indigenous plants in the ravine.

You can still attend the final indoor performance of Cracks in Creeks at the Collingwood Neighbourhood House Annex on September 22, from 6 to 7:30 pm. Join in witnessing the culmination of this youth mentorship project that spanned the entire summer.

Over many weeks, the performers of Cracks in Creeks were inspired by knowledge about Renfrew Ravine’s ecosystem, teachings about Indigenous plants and medicines, eco-art created by Still Moon Arts, and choreography lessons by professional dance mentors. Entrance to the final performance is based on a sliding scale from $5 to $20.

For more information on the performance and all events happening in September, visit the new website at stillmoonarts.ca. Follow Still Moon Arts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @stillmoonarts to stay up to date on all of our news!


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Support your native bee pollinators

Julie-Cheng-beehouses

Checking out my mason bees at the end of the work day. The top bee house is homemade and the bottom was purchased at Figaro’s garden store. Photo by J. B. Fergusson

BY JULIE CHENG

Native bees are endangered due to pesticide use and loss of habitat. They are often better pollinators than the honeybee, helping pollinate our fruit trees and vegetables and preserve the native ecosystem. We need to whatever we can to help these efficient pollinators.

With the expert guidance of staff and volunteers by the organization Hives 4 Humanity, I was inspired to build bee homes from reclaimed wood for my backyard to give the little native pollinators a place to nest.

This summer, my apple trees and blueberry and raspberry bushes are bursting with fruit.

Mason bees working

Bees are cold blooded and here they are waiting for the morning sun to warm them before getting down to work. Photo by Julie Cheng

It’s a great way to start and end the work day, watching the bees. The bees are fascinating and super-cute.

What you can do to help native bees

  • Plant native wildflowers that are bee-friendly
  • Plant some bee turf instead of grass for your lawn
  • Do not use pesticides or herbicides in your garden
  • Build a bee home in your garden
  • Purchase bee cocoons and set them out in spring/summer by your bee home
  • For bee supplies, check your local garden store (like Figaro’s, West Coast Seeds) or online store (beediverse.com)
Butterflies-pollinators

Butterflies are also pollinators. Photo by J. B. Fergusson

Julie Cheng has lived in the neighbourhood for more than 20 years and is the editor of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

Copyright 2019 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News