Renfrew-Collingwood Community News

News stories from the Renfrew-Collingwood community in East Vancouver


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Read On: Renfrew Ravine

Quirky Bench Renfrew Ravine

Just before you reach 22nd Avenue in the Renfrew Ravine, stop to admire the quirky two-person stone bench. Photo by Julie Cheng

BY TONY WANLESS

Residents of Renfrew-Collingwood can consider themselves lucky because in their neighbourhood is an oasis of nature and calm that acts as a relief from the usual city noise and energy.

The Renfrew Ravine is an urban jewel – a little bit of wilderness that is a reminder of what all of Vancouver once looked like.

This section of forest and stream sits surrounded by busy streets with car, truck and transit noise and all the other sounds that are a feature of daily life in a city.

It reminds us that, not long ago, Vancouver was a lush wilderness teeming with birds, animals and fish, and which was home to many Native peoples.

A walk in the ravine begins across the street from the busy 29th Avenue Skytrain transit station and makes its way through forest, brambles and berry bushes that border a small gurgling, stream that makes its way along the floor of the valley on the left side of the trail.

As you walk, be sure to stop and visit the Renfrew Ravine Labyrinth, a large circle of stones that imitate ancient stone circles created by peoples around the world thousands of years ago. Built in 2002, it has become a favourite meditation spot, so follow the circles and have a little meditation of your own.

Then continue down the path, past houses and along the laneway, until the path picks up again. Just before you reach 22nd Avenue, stop to admire the quirky two-person stone bench. Cross the street and go down the hill to the left of Renfrew Park Community Centre, along a path that borders a tumbling stream. Sometimes, in early spring, you can see little fish swimming in the waters just before the creek goes under Grandview Highway.

At this point you will probably notice something about yourself. Stress, sadness or weariness that might have bothered you before are now gone. That is the revitalizing power of a walk in the ravine.

Read On Word Search Renfrew Ravine October 2017

 

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News


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October 2017 issue of RCC News is here

Renfrew-Collingwood Community News October 2017

This issue of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News is full of the many wonderful people, events and programs happening in our neighbourhood!

Get your latest issue of the RCC News at your local coffee shop, grocery store, library and community centre.

Or click on the cover image to view the new issue.

In this issue:

  • Still Moon Arts brings Still Creek to life through art, memories and history
  • A new wave of food security: Ways to improve your environmental footprint
  • Call for artists in Renfrew-Collingwood
  • Take part in Homelessness Action Week: Film and panel discussion Oct. 11, 6:30 pm
  • Robert F. Edwards visits Ghana
  • Vancouver Walk for Reconciliation 2017: ‘Namwayut – We are all one
  • 5 things you should know about the Vancouver by-election

Do you have a local story to tell or an event to share? We’d love to hear about it! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

The deadline for the November 2017 issue is October 10. We welcome story submissions from 300 to 400 words long. Accompanying photos must be high resolution in a jpg file at least 1 MB large and include a photo caption and the name of the photographer.


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Why I love Renfrew-Collingwood: Livable, accessible, friendly

A spring day on a quiet street in Renfrew-Collingwood, with Grouse Mountain and Seymour Mountain in the background. Photos by Julie Cheng

A spring day on a quiet street in Renfrew-Collingwood, with Grouse Mountain and Seymour Mountain in the background. Photos by Julie Cheng

BY JULIE CHENG

Renfrew-Collingwood is a special place where its warm and friendly residents of diverse cultures—pioneers and newcomers, young and old—live together in harmony and feel like they belong. The locals come out in droves to two annual festivals to celebrate this diversity: Collingwood Days and the Renfrew Ravine Harvest Moon Festival.

Still Creek runs through Renfrew Ravine.

Still Creek runs through the heart of Renfrew Ravine.

This historic residential neighbourhood is tucked away on the eastern edge of Vancouver on the border of Burnaby, B.C. The neighbourhood is home to hidden gems, from unexpected sweeping mountain views and the Renfrew Ravine (an urban forest with a salmon-bearing creek running through it) to Carleton School (one of the oldest schoolhouses in Vancouver) to many authentic, ethnic restaurants including Chinese, Japanese, Malaysian, Filipino, Italian and Indian.

Residents travel by Skytrain and cycle paths alike in Renfrew-Collingwood.

Residents travel by Skytrain and cycle paths alike in Renfrew-Collingwood.

It’s always been an easy neighbourhood to get to. In the 1890s the interurban tram connected Renfrew-Collingwood to the rest of Vancouver. Today two Skytrain lines run through it, carrying residents to and from work in a matter of minutes, north to Port Moody (on the brand-new Evergreen line), east to Burnaby and Surrey and west to downtown Vancouver. Walking or cycling is a great way to discover the neighbourhood.

Why do you love Renfrew-Collingwood? Please let us know! Email rccnews-editorial@cnh.bc.ca.

Julie Cheng has loved living in Renfrew-Collingwood for 20 years. She is the editor of the Renfrew-Collingwood Community News.

Copyright (c) 2017 Renfrew-Collingwood Community News